Pearlene

Now that the neo-garage craze has died down, is it time for a little neo-boogie? Cincinnati blooze band Pearlene resembles the hip-shaking sound of Exile On Main Street-era Rolling Stones and early Joe Cocker, though Pearlene plays darker and heavier, and covers nearly every song on its third album, For Western Violence And Brief Sensuality, in a thick, druggy haze. Epic workouts like "Watch The Way" and "High And Dangerous" take a low-to-the-ground approach, but the results are grandiose, as ominous organ and echoing guitars fill the room like a static charge. Pearlene strives to keep a vamp rolling as long as possible, and when it works up one as loose and raw as the album-opening "Hosannah," it feels like it could go for days.

Noel Murray / AV Club / @NoelMu

 
 
 Pearlene live, Reuben & AJ, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

Pearlene live, Reuben & AJ, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

PRE-SALE limited edition
10 Year Anniversary

"For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" +
"Rosemary Girl" EP Double Record 180 Gram VINYL 300ct

ORDER NOW

"For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" is the band's most cohesive and powerful effort to date, following a couple of great releases for respected indie imprints Dim Mak and Sympathy For The Record Industry. While the energy and soul is still turned up to 11, the new album tightens the focus of Pearlene's vision with a fascinatingly multidimensional sound that is a Southern Psychedlic powerhouse.

We're excited to celebrate Pearlene's 10 year anniversary of "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality," with a limited-edition, 300ct, 180 gram double record. On this record you not only get the 9 classic tunes of this great record, but also, the unreleased EP, "Rosemary Girl," which featured 3 unreleased songs featured in "Sons of Anarchy,"  an American crime drama television series.

Produced by John Curley and Reuben Glaser
Recorded and Mixed by John Curley at Ultrasuede Studio, Cincinnati, OH
Additional recording at Rosalyn Apartments by Reuben Glaser
Additional recording equipment Rick Lawson at Auraphic Pro Audio
Special thanks to Seth Bender for letting us record with his Gibson & Silvertone

Mastered for vinyl by JJ Golden at Golden Mastering, Ventura, CA

Reuben Glaser - Vocals and Guitar
Jesse Ebaugh - Bass and Vocals
Andrew Jody - Drums
Andrew Higley - Hammond B3, Fender Rhodes, Piano and Bowed Saw 

 Pearlene live, Jesse & Beth, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

Pearlene live, Jesse & Beth, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

 Pearlene live, Beth, Kristen & AJ, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

Pearlene live, Beth, Kristen & AJ, at Taste of Cincinnati, on the "For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality" tour

WHat people are saying

Pearlene's Reuben Glaser has one of those delicious, maple-coated voices that recalls the golden age of classic rock n roll and all that was good about it, with none of the bad. He and his Cincinnati quartet previously busted a bucket of country blues on 2003 s #Murder Blues and Prayer#, and they re completely down for the new loose and sultry vibe that drives the action here. Watch the Way and All Fears (Have Faces), deliver wrenching sonic emotion; the acoustic I Hate the Blues, brings on a dark fiddler. We All Get Off might as well be an outtake from #Let It Be#, and The Shot is finger-picked folk for gods sake. Though at times Glaser s guitar conjures lesser Gods of his instrument (Lennon, Cobain) there are brilliant gashes of Neil and sharp shards of Jerry in his work. But make no mistake, this ain't no hippie stuff: it s the new breed of psychedelic garage blues. Dig It.

Denise Sullivan - Harp Magazine


"For Western Violence and Brief Sensuality," Covington, Kentucky is not really known for the blues, but Pearlene is loudly putting it on the map as it cranks out some of the heaviest and most convincing psychedelic blues to hit the American street in years. This powerful band s incendiary third record opens deceptively with a rollicking barrelhouse piano, but the track veers quickly into a greasy, guitar-fueled groove that leaves whimsy behind and hints at the urgency ahead. Three tracks later, on Watch the Way, Pearlene put their pedal down and lock into bottom-heavy bass, churning psychedelic guitar riffs and a wary, almost sinister vocal by Rueben Glaser that sounds like someone might just get a knife pressed to their throat. The tracks, alternating between southern shuffles and heavy-duty dirges, are immediate and raw, but they never press too hard. Pearlene lets haunting songs like I Hate the Blues unfold at an appropriately languid pace. They've already learned to let the blues fill in the gaps. A slew of good young bands are reinventing psychedelic blues. Put Pearlene at or near the top of the heap. [High Dangerous]

Michael Coleman - Your Flesh Magazine

"For Western Violence And Brief Sensuality" Cincinnati's Pearlene come from a long line of southern Ohio, flannel flag-waving, off-campus riff railers: Greenhorn, the Greenhornes, Grafton. On their third album in six years, however, Pearlene has four-wheeled away from '90s-til-now Buckeye indie lo-fi, and are slouching instead towards the stadium hoof-stomp of '70s Midwestern mire like Grand Funk Railroad. Guided along by Afghan Whigs' bassist John Curley's production, Hammond organ and boogie piano lead most of the charges, like the saloon swagger of "Hosannah," the Stones-y mood swing of "All Fears (Have Faces)" or the thunder-thump rawker, "Numbers." These guys tend to keep their shirts on and probably finish reading a book once in a while, hence For Western Violence can sit elbow to elbow with the decidedly rocking end of the rustic folk/blues predilections of the Oakley Halls and Catfish Havens of the indie outback. With less propriety filters than those acts, but less factory floor gunk than in the bowels of their teen-years heroes like Mule, Pearlene just keep on truckin'.

Eric Davidson - C.M.J